Safe Routes to School


On December 1st at 2:00pm EST, join national experts and local policymakers for an in-depth discussion of key strategies state and local policymakers, including school boards and administrators, can use to address childhood obesity, hosted by the National School Boards Association.

Policymakers are the audience – so ask your community’s education and city/county policymakers to consider joining.  Non policy-makers are also welcome.

This two-hour webcast, Leadership in Action: Policymakers Addressing Childhood Obesity through Collaboration and Policy Change, will highlight the Leadership for Healthy Communities Action Strategies Toolkit, a resource for state and local policymakers to collaborate in creating healthier schools and communities through policy change. The webcast will focus on two strategies from the Toolkit that help local school leaders collaborate with other policymakers: “Safe Routes to School programs” and “joint-use agreements.” Speakers will include:

  • Rob Krupicka, Councilmember, City of Alexandria (Alexandria, VA)
  • Maya Rockeymoore, Director, Leadership for Healthy Communities
  • Robert Ogilvie, Program Director, Planning for Healthy Places
  • Karla Hampton, Staff Attorney, National Policy & Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity
  • Ken Testa, Chief Facilities Officer, Merced City School District (Merced, CA)
  • Margo Pedroso, Deputy Director, Safe Routes to School National Partnership
  • Carmen Pineyro, Board Member, Freeport Union Free School District (Freeport, NY)

These experts will provide an overview and examples of how to collaborate with the key stakeholders to make these strategies work in your district and community, along with resources to get you started. There will be ample opportunity for attendees to interact with the speakers.

Hosted by the National School Boards Association with support from Leadership for Healthy Communities, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and in partnership with the Education Solutions Global Network, an activity of the Missouri School Boards Association, this webcast will provide the information, tools, and resources you need to create healthier environments for students in your schools and community.

The event begins at 2:00pm EST (1:00pm CST, 12:00pm MST, 11:00am PST).  Registration is FREE but registration is required—please register here.  If you have any questions about the webcast, contact Emily Kujawa, Project Coordinator at NSBA (ekujawa@nsba.org, 703-838-6743).

On December 1st at 2:00pm EST, join national experts and local policymakers for an in-depth discussion of key strategies state and local policymakers, including school boards and administrators, can use to address childhood obesity, hosted by the National School Boards Association.

Policymakers are the audience – so ask your community’s education and city/county policymakers to consider joining.  Non policy-makers are also welcome.

This two-hour webcast, Leadership in Action: Policymakers Addressing Childhood Obesity through Collaboration and Policy Change, will highlight the Leadership for Healthy Communities Action Strategies Toolkit, a resource for state and local policymakers to collaborate in creating healthier schools and communities through policy change. The webcast will focus on two strategies from the Toolkit that help local school leaders collaborate with other policymakers: “Safe Routes to School programs” and “joint-use agreements.” Speakers will include:

  • Rob Krupicka, Councilmember, City of Alexandria (Alexandria, VA)
  • Maya Rockeymoore, Director, Leadership for Healthy Communities
  • Robert Ogilvie, Program Director, Planning for Healthy Places
  • Karla Hampton, Staff Attorney, National Policy & Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity
  • Ken Testa, Chief Facilities Officer, Merced City School District (Merced, CA)
  • Margo Pedroso, Deputy Director, Safe Routes to School National Partnership
  • Carmen Pineyro, Board Member, Freeport Union Free School District (Freeport, NY)

These experts will provide an overview and examples of how to collaborate with the key stakeholders to make these strategies work in your district and community, along with resources to get you started. There will be ample opportunity for attendees to interact with the speakers.

Hosted by the National School Boards Association with support from Leadership for Healthy Communities, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and in partnership with the Education Solutions Global Network, an activity of the Missouri School Boards Association, this webcast will provide the information, tools, and resources you need to create healthier environments for students in your schools and community.

The event begins at 2:00pm EST (1:00pm CST, 12:00pm MST, 11:00am PST).  Registration is FREE but registration is required—please register here.  If you have any questions about the webcast, contact Emily Kujawa, Project Coordinator at NSBA (ekujawa@nsba.org, 703-838-6743).

VDOT SRTS LogoThe WJCC School District is beginning to participate in Safe Routes to School, a  national program that aims to make it easier and safer for students living near  schools to walk or bicycle.  The program helps communities improve infrastructure–sidewalks, crosswalks, bike paths, signs–and also focuses on educating  children, their parents and others in the community on safe walking, bicycling, and driving behaviors.  The program derives great value in obtaining parents’ thoughts and opinions on letting their children walk or bicycle to school.

Five schools in the WJCC District are participating in the launch of the SRTS program.  The schools include:  Berkeley Middle School, Clara Byrd Baker Elementary School, James River Elementary School, Matoaka Elementary School, and Rawls Byrd Elementary School.  As a first step, the school division is conducting a survey of parents and guardians of children at each of these schools.  The survey is available online, and has 16 short-answer questions.

If you have children at the participating schools (or have friends who do), please take 5 to 10 minutes to answer the survey.  Your input is crucial to developing a safe, effective, and fun program at these schools.